OU Law Alumnus Vincent Logan named Special Trustee for American Indians

July 2, 2014 | By Jessica Jones

The U.S. Senate confirms OU Law alumnus Vincent G. Logan as the next Special Trustee for American Indians in the U.S. Department of Interior.  Logan is a member of Osage Nation and a founding member of the Native American Bar Association of Washington, DC.  

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell said, “As an investment professional, a mentor for Native American attorneys, and a member of the Osage Nation, Vince has been deeply rooted in Indian Country for many decades. His asset management expertise, legal experience and extensive network of professional relationships in Indian Country will well serve the Office of Special Trustee and the Department of the Interior as we work to build a stronger and more responsive trust asset management system for the Nation’s First Americans. I am pleased the Senate voted to confirm him to this leadership post at Interior.”

The Office of Special Trustee for American Indians works to improve the accountability and management of Indian funds held in trust by the federal government. As trustee, the Interior Department has the primary fiduciary responsibility to manage about $3.7 billion in tribal trust funds and Individual Indian Money accounts, as well as leases for developing natural resources, such as coal, oil, natural gas, timber and grazing, that generate income for those accounts.

Vincent G. Logan is the owner of The Nations Group, LLC, which works with Native American tribes on asset management, investment strategies, and financial education. He worked in the Private Banking and Investment Group at Merrill Lynch from 2006 to 2009, and was a corporate finance attorney for Schulte, Roth, & Zabel from 2001 to 2006. Prior to that, Mr. Logan worked in the Antitrust Division at the United States Department of Justice from 1996 to 1998. He was appointed to the Oklahoma State University Foundation Board of Governors in 2010. Mr. Logan is a member of the Osage Nation. He received a B.S. from Oklahoma State University and a J.D. from the University Of Oklahoma College of Law.

More News & Media

News

Legal Scholars to Speak at OU Law on Historical and Modern ‘Blackness as Nuisance’

Two legal scholars and authors will discuss historic and present-day permutations of a form of racial profiling in a Zoom webinar hosted by the University of Oklahoma College of Law, set for noon Wednesday, Oct. 21.

10/19/20

Blog

OU Law Conversations: Dean Emeritus Andrew Coats

What led you to OU Law? I have wanted to go to law school since I was a teenager. I was active in speech contests and enjoyed making oral presentations. When I was in high school, I would go downtown and watch some of the trials at the courthouse, so, I got acquainted with the courtroom rather early. I obtained a Navy scholarship to go to OU. I was a regular Navy midshipman then I served three years in the far east before coming back to law school. I wanted to attend law school and came back to OU.

10/12/20

Blog

OU Law Conversations: Robert Barnes

What led you to OU Law? OU Law has been part of my family since the 1920s. My great uncle was Dr. Maurice Merrill, a 1922 graduate of OU Law who then earned a Doctorate in Law from Harvard University in 1925. Merrill taught at OU Law for 30 years, published numerous seminal works in oil and gas law, constitutional law, administrative law and the law of Notice. While still in his twenties, Merrill published the seminal treatise Implied Covenants in Oil and Gas Law, which has been a cornerstone of my cases. In law school, I lived with Uncle Maurice and marveled at his longhand scrawl which was literally final copy in its first draft form. In my mind, he will always be ten times the lawyer that I ever became.

10/08/20

All News & Media

Thank you for your interest in applying to OU Law

Please select your program of interest to learn more about the application process.

J.D. ProgramM.L.S. ProgramLL.M. ProgramLegal Assistant Education Not sure? Learn more about admissions at OU Law